Childhood vaccines lead to autism fact

You are not getting the full story; you are not even getting a reasonable half story. The earth shattering scoop here is not about MMR, thimerosal, autism, tics, or language delays. It is about the very real possibility that there is outright malfeasance taking place at the federal agency responsible for vaccine safety, recommendation, promotion, and distribution.

Childhood vaccines lead to autism fact

Getty Images Advertisement Whooping cough, measles, mumps. These are the diseases that preyed on our parents' and grandparents' generations and that we thought were fading from existence.

In fact, all three diseases have seen a resurgence in the past decade. In Minnesota suffered a measles outbreak: In a large multistate measles outbreak started at a California amusement park, and many of those infected were unvaccinated children. These troubling events show that the failure to vaccinate children endangers both the health of children themselves as well as others who would not be exposed to preventable illness if the community as a whole were better protected.

Equally troubling, the number of deliberately unvaccinated children has grown large enough that it may be fueling more severe outbreaks. In a recent survey of more than 1, parents, one quarter held the mistaken belief that vaccines can cause autism in healthy children, and more than one in 10 had refused at least one recommended vaccine.

The Verge of Vaccine Mania

This sad state of affairs exists because parents have been persistently and insidiously misled by information in the press and on the Internet and because the health care system has not effectively communicated the counterarguments, which are powerful.

Physicians and other health experts can no longer just assume that parents will readily agree to childhood inoculations and leave any discussion about the potential risks and benefits to the last minute. They need to be more proactive, provide better information and engage parents much earlier than is usually the case.

Peril of business as usual Right now pediatricians typically bring up the need for vaccines during the well-baby checkup held about two months after birth.

That visit has a jam-packed agenda. In the usual 20 minutes allotted for the appointment, the physician must learn the answers to many questions, of which the following are but a sample: How many times is the baby waking to feed at night?

Is the child feeding well? Where do measurements of height, weight and head circumference fall on a standard growth chart? Do the parents know how and when to introduce solid food and how to safely lay the child down to sleep?

Are various reflexes good? Can the sounds of a heart murmur be heard through the stethoscope? Are the hip joints fitting properly in their sockets, or are they dislocated? Generally in the final seconds of the visit, assuming all has gone well up to this point, the doctor mentions the required schedule for six recommended inoculations: This is the point in the visit at which more and more pediatricians report a disheartening turn of events: A proper conversation that respects the reluctant parents' concerns, answers their questions and reassures them that the inoculations are indeed necessary—that countless studies by hundreds of researchers over many decades have shown that vaccinations save millions of lives—will likely take at least another 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, though, other families sit in the waiting room, itching for their own well-baby checkups to start. Having this discussion at the two-month well-baby visit is too late. By then, parents may have read about any issues on the Web or chatted with other moms and dads in the park.

Discussion with medical professionals should begin long before, usually during, or even prior to, the pregnancy.

Childhood vaccines lead to autism fact

Fears and facts Although parents give many reasons for not wanting to vaccinate their children, we have noticed at least three recurring themes. Some do not believe their children are at risk for diseases such as polio, measles and tetanus, which are now rarely seen in the U.

Straight Talk about Vaccination - Scientific American

Others do not believe that certain vaccine-preventable diseases, such as chicken pox and measles, are particularly serious. And many worry about the safety of vaccines. The concerns may be about immediate, well-defined side effects such as fever or may take the form of anxiety that vaccines might harm the immune system or cause chronic diseases years later.By: Marcella Piper-Terry, M.S., Founder of leslutinsduphoenix.com Okay.

I give up. Vaccines do not cause autism.

Childhood vaccines lead to autism fact

Autism is a behavioral diagnosis. In order to receive the diagnosis of “Autism” a child must exhibit a certain number of behaviors over a certain time frame. BY J.B. HANDLEY April 2, Five clear, replicable, and related discoveries explaining how autism is triggered have formed an undeniably clear picture of autism’s causation, and possibly ways to alleviate the symptoms, too.

I have been in the world of special-needs advocacy for 10 years, and in that time I have come across countless people who are defensive, close-minded, and extremely indoctrinated about their across-the-board absolute statements that vaccines can’t cause autism.

Thank you for putting all of this together in one place. It is interesting also to note that Julie Geberding was head of the CDC during the time () that Thompson’s paper was published prior to her move to Merck as President of Vaccines. Vaccines do not cause autism. Despite much controversy on the topic, researchers haven't found a connection between autism and childhood vaccines.

In fact, the original study that ignited the debate years ago has been retracted. Jan 05,  · A now-retracted British study that linked autism to childhood vaccines was an "elaborate fraud" that has done long-lasting damage to public health, a leading medical publication reported Wednesday.

Facts and Fiction about Childhood Vaccines and Autism –